The Inside Scoop

When I was first learning to sew, I’d often remark, “It’s a good thing no one can see the inside!” I’ve heard the same comment from others who are new to the hobby, and I always try to reassure them that it will change and some day the insides of what they sew won’t have to be hidden.

I finished this jacket today and have to say that I’m particularly pleased with the insides. While I always turn a garment inside out during and after sewing, this is the first time I think I’ve ever photographed the results. (I’m not sure if the person to whom this jacket has been sent reads my blog but she has a great sense of humor and I think she’ll laugh to see it inside out and hanging from a tree.)

The pattern is a modified version of Butterick 5187. I combined a couple of the views so the jacket would look more like a smaller one I’ve sewn, right down to the binding on the sleeves. This particular jacket has gone a step further with the addition of welt pockets with flaps (which is a post for another day).

What makes this jacket special in my eyes is the amount of hand sewing involved. I’ll be the first to admit that I avoid hand sewing whenever I can. I’m kind of an immediate gratification sort of girl; I equate hand sewing with “labor intensive” and “time consuming.” Seriously, who has time for that?

Let me tell ya: sometimes it is worth it. This jacket would be lovely no matter what but I really think the hand sewing — the facings, hem, bindings — elevate it in the construction department. Yes, I could have finished the jacket two hours faster but it wouldn’t be quite the same.